Daily Archives: August 17, 2008

اكتساب أحمد المسلمين لحب اكتر من مليون معلم

أحمد المسلمانى واكتسابه لحب المعلمين

أى حد هيشارك المعلمين ولو بكلمه طيبه
اكتسب حبهم
ماتعرفوش تعملوا كده ولا انتو
ماتعرفوش غير
قبض
افرج
سجن
كبت
طنش


الراجل قال بصحيح العبارة الامتحان ده للتصفية وان الناجحين من الفئة المرضى عنهم من اعضاء الحزب وذوى النفوذ
الراجل قال ان الحل فى انهاء هذه المهزلة هو تلغراف بربع جنيه الى قصر العروبة من جميع المعلمين
بعض الاخوة تعبوا وذاكروا وقالوا يا ارض انهدى ما عليكى ادى , لا تتخدوا يا اخوانى الغاء الاختبار هو الحل الآمن لنعود الى المربع صفر مربع الامان والكرامة

عاوزين حد يعبرنا ويرد علينا مش كده ياجماعه
انتم عماليين تكبتوا فيننا وتطنشونا
علشان ايه هو احنا زعلانكم بحاجه
بتقول شمال شمال يمين يمين

أحمد المسلمانى واكتسابه لحب المعلمين

أى حد هيشارك المعلمين ولو بكلمه طيبه
اكتسب حبهم
ماتعرفوش تعملوا كده ولا انتو
ماتعرفوش غير
قبض
افرج
سجن
كبت
طنش

الراجل قال بصحيح العبارة الامتحان ده للتصفية وان الناجحين من الفئة المرضى عنهم من اعضاء الحزب وذوى النفوذ
الراجل قال ان الحل فى انهاء هذه المهزلة هو تلغراف بربع جنيه الى قصر العروبة من جميع المعلمين
بعض الاخوة تعبوا وذاكروا وقالوا يا ارض انهدى ما عليكى ادى , لا تتخدوا يا اخوانى الغاء الاختبار هو الحل الآمن لنعود الى المربع صفر مربع الامان والكرامة

شرح اللغة الانجليزية بكادر المعلمين 2

Simple sentences . . .

contain only one independent clause. Example:

Mrs. Bergey enjoys teaching writing.


What are Compound Sentences?

They join two or more independent clauses (simple sentences). Compound sentences join ideas of equal importance.

Mrs. Bergey enjoys teaching writing.
Mrs. Bergey wants her students to succeed.

becomes:

Mrs. Bergey enjoys teaching writing, and she wants her students to succeed.

A compound sentence contains two sentences joined by and, or, or but. These words are called conjunctions. Compound sentences express more than one complete thought.

What are Complex Sentences?

Complex sentences join one or more dependent clauses to the independent clause. Complex sentences are useful when your writing includes some ideas that are more important than others.

Mrs. Bergey, a teacher at Twentynine Palms Elementary School, enjoys teaching writing.

A complex sentence contains a clause (a statement) that is not a complete sentence. This is in addition to the complete sentence. “a teacher at Twentynine Palms Elementary School” is not a complete sentence and would not stand on its own. (That is why it is sometimes called a “dependent” clause. It depends on the rest of the sentence.)

HINT for succesful writers:
Use a variety of sentences styles in your writing!


The Structure of a Sentence

Remember that every clause is, in a sense, a miniature sentence. A simple sentences contains only a single clause, while a compound sentence, a complex sentence, or a compound-complex sentence contains at least two clauses.

The Simple Sentence

The most basic type of sentence is the simple sentence, which contains only one clause. A simple sentence can be as short as one word:

Run!

Usually, however, the sentence has a subject as well as a predicate and both the subject and the predicate may have modifiers. All of the following are simple sentences, because each contains only one clause:

Melt!

Ice melts.

The ice melts quickly.

The ice on the river melts quickly under the warm March sun.

Lying exposed without its blanket of snow, the ice on the river melts quickly under the warm March sun.

As you can see, a simple sentence can be quite long — it is a mistake to think that you can tell a simple sentence from a compound sentence or a complex sentence simply by its length.

The most natural sentence structure is the simple sentence: it is the first kind which children learn to speak, and it remains by far the most common sentence in the spoken language of people of all ages. In written work, simple sentences can be very effective for grabbing a reader’s attention or for summing up an argument, but you have to use them with care: too many simple sentences can make your writing seem childish.

When you do use simple sentences, you should add transitional phrases to connect them to the surrounding sentences.

The Compound Sentence

A compound sentence consists of two or more independent clauses (or simple sentences) joined by co-ordinating conjunctions like “and,” “but,” and “or”:

Simple

Canada is a rich country.

Simple

Still, it has many poor people.

Compound

Canada is a rich country, but still it has many poor people.

Compound sentences are very natural for English speakers — small children learn to use them early on to connect their ideas and to avoid pausing (and allowing an adult to interrupt):

Today at school Mr. Moore brought in his pet rabbit, and he showed it to the class, and I got to pet it, and Kate held it, and we coloured pictures of it, and it ate part of my carrot at lunch, and …

Of course, this is an extreme example, but if you over-use compound sentences in written work, your writing might seem immature.

A compound sentence is most effective when you use it to create a sense of balance or contrast between two (or more) equally-important pieces of information:

Montéal has better clubs, but Toronto has better cinemas.

Special Cases of Compound Sentences

There are two special types of compound sentences which you might want to note. First, rather than joining two simple sentences together, a co-ordinating conjunction sometimes joins two complex sentences, or one simple sentence and one complex sentence. In this case, the sentence is called a compound-complex sentence:

compound-complex

The package arrived in the morning, but the courier left before I could check the contents.

The second special case involves punctuation. It is possible to join two originally separate sentences into a compound sentence using a semicolon instead of a co-ordinating conjunction:

Sir John A. Macdonald had a serious drinking problem; when sober, however, he could be a formidable foe in the House of Commons.

Usually, a conjunctive adverb like “however” or “consequently” will appear near the beginning of the second part, but it is not required:

The sun rises in the east; it sets in the west.

The Complex Sentence

A complex sentence contains one independent clause and at least one dependent clause. Unlike a compound sentence, however, a complex sentence contains clauses which are not equal. Consider the following examples:

Simple

My friend invited me to a party. I do not want to go.

Compound

My friend invited me to a party, but I do not want to go.

Complex

Although my friend invited me to a party, I do not want to go.

In the first example, there are two separate simple sentences: “My friend invited me to a party” and “I do not want to go.” The second example joins them together into a single sentence with the co-ordinating conjunction “but,” but both parts could still stand as independent sentences — they are entirely equal, and the reader cannot tell which is most important. In the third example, however, the sentence has changed quite a bit: the first clause, “Although my friend invited me to a party,” has become incomplete, or a dependent clause.

A complex sentence is very different from a simple sentence or a compound sentence because it makes clear which ideas are most important. When you write

My friend invited me to a party. I do not want to go.

or even

My friend invited me to a party, but I do not want to go.

The reader will have trouble knowing which piece of information is most important to you. When you write the subordinating conjunction “although” at the beginning of the first clause, however, you make it clear that the fact that your friend invited you is less important than, or subordinate, to the fact that you do not want to go.

Written by David Megginson

INFLECTIONAL VS. DERIVATIONAL MORPHOLOGY

Another important and perhaps universal distinction is the one between derivational and inflectional morphemes.

Derivational morphemes makes new words from old ones (Crystal, p. 90.) Thus creation is formed from create , but they are two separate words.

Derivational morphemes generally:

1) Change the part of speech or the basic meaning of a word. Thus -ment added to a verb forms a noun (judg-ment). re-activate means “activate again.”

2) Are not required by syntactic relations outside the word. Thus un-kind combines un- and kind into a single new word, but has no particular syntactic connections outside the word — we can say he is unkind or he is kind or they are unkind or they are kind, depending on what we mean.

3) Are often not productive — derivational morphemes can be selective about what they’ll combine with, and may also have erratic effects on meaning. Thus the suffix -hood occurs with just a few nouns such as brother, neighbor, and knight, but not with most others. e.g., *friendhood, *daughterhood, or *candlehood. Furthermore “brotherhood” can mean “the state or relationship of being brothers,” but “neighborhood” cannot mean “the state or relationship of being neighbors.”

4) Typically occur between the stem and any inflectional affixes. Thus in governments,-ment, a derivational suffix, precedes -s, an inflectional suffix.

5) In English, may appear either as prefixes or suffixes: pre-arrange, arrange-ment.

Inflectional morphemes: vary (or “inflect”) the form of words in order to express grammatical features, such as singular/plural or past/present tense. Thus Boy and boys, for example, are two different forms of the “same” word; the choice between them, singular vs. plural, is a matter of grammar and thus the business of inflectional morphology. (Crystal, p. 90.)

Inflectional Morphemes generally:

1) Do not change basic meaning or part of speech, e.g., big, bigg-er, bigg-est are all adjectives.

2) Express grammatically-required features or indicate relations between different words in the sentence. Thus in Lee love-s Kim: -s marks the 3rd person singular present form of the verb, and also relates it to the 3rd singular subject Lee.

3) Are productive. Inflectional morphemes typically combine freely with all members of some large class of morphemes, with predictable effects on usage/meaning. Thus the plural morpheme can be combined with nearly any noun, usually in the same form, and usually with the same effect on meaning.

4) Occur outside any derivational morphemes. Thus in ration-al-iz-ation-s the final -s is inflectional, and appears at the very end of the word, outside the derivational morphemes -al, -iz, -ation.

5) In English, are suffixes only.

Some English morphemes, by category:

derivational

inflectional

-ation

-s Plural

-al

-s Possessive

-ize

-ed Past

-ic

-ing Progressive

-y

-er Comparative

-ous

-est Superlative

شرح اللغة الانجليزية بكادر المعلمين 2

Simple sentences . . .

contain only one independent clause. Example:

Mrs. Bergey enjoys teaching writing.


What are Compound Sentences?

They join two or more independent clauses (simple sentences). Compound sentences join ideas of equal importance.

Mrs. Bergey enjoys teaching writing.
Mrs. Bergey wants her students to succeed.

becomes:

Mrs. Bergey enjoys teaching writing, and she wants her students to succeed.

A compound sentence contains two sentences joined by and, or, or but. These words are called conjunctions. Compound sentences express more than one complete thought.

What are Complex Sentences?

Complex sentences join one or more dependent clauses to the independent clause. Complex sentences are useful when your writing includes some ideas that are more important than others.

Mrs. Bergey, a teacher at Twentynine Palms Elementary School, enjoys teaching writing.

A complex sentence contains a clause (a statement) that is not a complete sentence. This is in addition to the complete sentence. “a teacher at Twentynine Palms Elementary School” is not a complete sentence and would not stand on its own. (That is why it is sometimes called a “dependent” clause. It depends on the rest of the sentence.)

HINT for succesful writers:
Use a variety of sentences styles in your writing!


The Structure of a Sentence

Remember that every clause is, in a sense, a miniature sentence. A simple sentences contains only a single clause, while a compound sentence, a complex sentence, or a compound-complex sentence contains at least two clauses.

The Simple Sentence

The most basic type of sentence is the simple sentence, which contains only one clause. A simple sentence can be as short as one word:

Run!

Usually, however, the sentence has a subject as well as a predicate and both the subject and the predicate may have modifiers. All of the following are simple sentences, because each contains only one clause:

Melt!

Ice melts.

The ice melts quickly.

The ice on the river melts quickly under the warm March sun.

Lying exposed without its blanket of snow, the ice on the river melts quickly under the warm March sun.

As you can see, a simple sentence can be quite long — it is a mistake to think that you can tell a simple sentence from a compound sentence or a complex sentence simply by its length.

The most natural sentence structure is the simple sentence: it is the first kind which children learn to speak, and it remains by far the most common sentence in the spoken language of people of all ages. In written work, simple sentences can be very effective for grabbing a reader’s attention or for summing up an argument, but you have to use them with care: too many simple sentences can make your writing seem childish.

When you do use simple sentences, you should add transitional phrases to connect them to the surrounding sentences.

The Compound Sentence

A compound sentence consists of two or more independent clauses (or simple sentences) joined by co-ordinating conjunctions like “and,” “but,” and “or”:

Simple

Canada is a rich country.

Simple

Still, it has many poor people.

Compound

Canada is a rich country, but still it has many poor people.

Compound sentences are very natural for English speakers — small children learn to use them early on to connect their ideas and to avoid pausing (and allowing an adult to interrupt):

Today at school Mr. Moore brought in his pet rabbit, and he showed it to the class, and I got to pet it, and Kate held it, and we coloured pictures of it, and it ate part of my carrot at lunch, and …

Of course, this is an extreme example, but if you over-use compound sentences in written work, your writing might seem immature.

A compound sentence is most effective when you use it to create a sense of balance or contrast between two (or more) equally-important pieces of information:

Montéal has better clubs, but Toronto has better cinemas.

Special Cases of Compound Sentences

There are two special types of compound sentences which you might want to note. First, rather than joining two simple sentences together, a co-ordinating conjunction sometimes joins two complex sentences, or one simple sentence and one complex sentence. In this case, the sentence is called a compound-complex sentence:

compound-complex

The package arrived in the morning, but the courier left before I could check the contents.

The second special case involves punctuation. It is possible to join two originally separate sentences into a compound sentence using a semicolon instead of a co-ordinating conjunction:

Sir John A. Macdonald had a serious drinking problem; when sober, however, he could be a formidable foe in the House of Commons.

Usually, a conjunctive adverb like “however” or “consequently” will appear near the beginning of the second part, but it is not required:

The sun rises in the east; it sets in the west.

The Complex Sentence

A complex sentence contains one independent clause and at least one dependent clause. Unlike a compound sentence, however, a complex sentence contains clauses which are not equal. Consider the following examples:

Simple

My friend invited me to a party. I do not want to go.

Compound

My friend invited me to a party, but I do not want to go.

Complex

Although my friend invited me to a party, I do not want to go.

In the first example, there are two separate simple sentences: “My friend invited me to a party” and “I do not want to go.” The second example joins them together into a single sentence with the co-ordinating conjunction “but,” but both parts could still stand as independent sentences — they are entirely equal, and the reader cannot tell which is most important. In the third example, however, the sentence has changed quite a bit: the first clause, “Although my friend invited me to a party,” has become incomplete, or a dependent clause.

A complex sentence is very different from a simple sentence or a compound sentence because it makes clear which ideas are most important. When you write

My friend invited me to a party. I do not want to go.

or even

My friend invited me to a party, but I do not want to go.

The reader will have trouble knowing which piece of information is most important to you. When you write the subordinating conjunction “although” at the beginning of the first clause, however, you make it clear that the fact that your friend invited you is less important than, or subordinate, to the fact that you do not want to go.

Written by David Megginson

INFLECTIONAL VS. DERIVATIONAL MORPHOLOGY

Another important and perhaps universal distinction is the one between derivational and inflectional morphemes.

Derivational morphemes makes new words from old ones (Crystal, p. 90.) Thus creation is formed from create , but they are two separate words.

Derivational morphemes generally:

1) Change the part of speech or the basic meaning of a word. Thus -ment added to a verb forms a noun (judg-ment). re-activate means “activate again.”

2) Are not required by syntactic relations outside the word. Thus un-kind combines un- and kind into a single new word, but has no particular syntactic connections outside the word — we can say he is unkind or he is kind or they are unkind or they are kind, depending on what we mean.

3) Are often not productive — derivational morphemes can be selective about what they’ll combine with, and may also have erratic effects on meaning. Thus the suffix -hood occurs with just a few nouns such as brother, neighbor, and knight, but not with most others. e.g., *friendhood, *daughterhood, or *candlehood. Furthermore “brotherhood” can mean “the state or relationship of being brothers,” but “neighborhood” cannot mean “the state or relationship of being neighbors.”

4) Typically occur between the stem and any inflectional affixes. Thus in governments,-ment, a derivational suffix, precedes -s, an inflectional suffix.

5) In English, may appear either as prefixes or suffixes: pre-arrange, arrange-ment.

Inflectional morphemes: vary (or “inflect”) the form of words in order to express grammatical features, such as singular/plural or past/present tense. Thus Boy and boys, for example, are two different forms of the “same” word; the choice between them, singular vs. plural, is a matter of grammar and thus the business of inflectional morphology. (Crystal, p. 90.)

Inflectional Morphemes generally:

1) Do not change basic meaning or part of speech, e.g., big, bigg-er, bigg-est are all adjectives.

2) Express grammatically-required features or indicate relations between different words in the sentence. Thus in Lee love-s Kim: -s marks the 3rd person singular present form of the verb, and also relates it to the 3rd singular subject Lee.

3) Are productive. Inflectional morphemes typically combine freely with all members of some large class of morphemes, with predictable effects on usage/meaning. Thus the plural morpheme can be combined with nearly any noun, usually in the same form, and usually with the same effect on meaning.

4) Occur outside any derivational morphemes. Thus in ration-al-iz-ation-s the final -s is inflectional, and appears at the very end of the word, outside the derivational morphemes -al, -iz, -ation.

5) In English, are suffixes only.

Some English morphemes, by category:

derivational

inflectional

-ation

-s Plural

-al

-s Possessive

-ize

-ed Past

-ic

-ing Progressive

-y

-er Comparative

-ous

-est Superlative

شرح اللغة الانجليزية بكادر المعلمين 1

Word formation processes: Ways of creating new words in English

1. Affixation: adding a derivational affix to a word. Examples: abuser, refusal, untie, inspection, pre-cook.
2. Compounding: joining two or more words into one new word. Examples: skateboard, whitewash, cat lover, self-help, red-hot, etc.
3. Zero derivation: (also called conversion or functional shift): Adding no affixes; simply using a word of one category as a word of another category. Examples: Noun-verb: comb, sand, knife, butter, referee, proposition.
4. Stress shift: no affix is added to the base, but the stress is shifted from one syllable to the other. With the stress shift comes a change in category.

Noun Verb
cómbine combíne
ímplant implánt
réwrite rewríte
tránsport transpórt

Noun Adjective
cóncrete concréte
ábstract abstráct

5. Clipping: shortening of a polysyllabic word. Examples: bro (
6. Acronym formation: forming words from the initials of a group of words that designate one concept. Usually, but not always, capitalized. An acronym is pronounced as a word if the consonants and vowels line up in such a way as to make this possible, otherwise it is pronounced as a string of letter names. Examples: NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), scuba (self-contained underwater breathing apparatus), radar (radio detecting and ranging), NFL (National Football League), AFL-CIO (American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations).
7. Blending: Parts (which are not morphemes!) of two already-existing words are put together to form a new word. Examples: motel (motor hotel) brunch (breakfast & lunch), smog (smoke & fog), telethon (television & marathon), modem (modulator & demodulator), Spanglish (Spanish & English).
8. Backformation: A suffix identifiable from other words is cut off of a base which has previously not been a word; that base then is used as a root, and becomes a word through widespread use. Examples: pronunciate (phonological part of the word which is not interpretable as an affix or word is cut off (e.g. the ‘-essor’ of ‘professor’ is not a suffix or word; nor is the ‘-ther’ of ‘brother’. In backformation, the bit chopped off is a recognizable affix or word (‘ham ‘ in ‘hamburger’), ‘-ion’ in ‘self-destruction’. Backformation is the result of a false but plausible morphological analysis of the word; clipping is a strictly phonological process that is used to make the word shorter. Clipping is based on syllable structure, not morphological analysis. It is impossible for you to recognize backformed words or come up with examples from your own knowledge of English, unless you already know the history of the word. Most people do not know the history of the words they know; this is normal.
9. Adoption of brand names as common words: a brand name becomes the name for the item or process associated with the brand name. The word ceases to be capitalized and acts as a normal verb/noun (i.e. takes inflections such as plural or past tense). The companies using the names usually have copyrighted them and object to their use in public documents, so they should be avoided in formal writing (or a lawsuit could follow!) Examples: xerox, kleenex, band-aid, kitty litter.
10. Onomatopoeia (pronounced: ‘onno-motto-pay-uh’): words are invented which (to native speakers at least) sound like the sound they name or the entity which produces the sound. Examples: hiss, sizzle, cuckoo, cock-a-doodle-doo, buzz, beep, ding-dong.
11. Borrowing: a word is taken from another language. It may be adapted to the borrowing language’s phonological system to varying degrees. Examples: skunk, tomato (from indigenous languages of the Americas), sushi, taboo, wok (from Pacific Rim languages), chic, shmuck, macho, spaghetti, dirndl, psychology, telephone, physician, education (from European languages), hummus, chutzpah, cipher, artichoke (from Semitic languages), yam, tote, banana (from African languages).

3.5 Semantics

3.5.1 Basic Notions of Semantics

A perennial problem in semantics is the delineation of its subject matter. The term meaning can be used in a variety of ways, and only some of these correspond to the usual understanding of the scope of linguistic or computational semantics. We shall take the scope of semantics to be restricted to the literal interpretations of sentences in a context, ignoring phenomena like irony, metaphor, or conversational implicature

A standard assumption in computationally oriented semantics is that knowledge of the meaning of a sentence can be equated with knowledge of its truth conditions: that is, knowledge of what the world would be like if the sentence were true. This is not the same as knowing whether a sentence is true, which is (usually) an empirical matter, but knowledge of truth conditions is a prerequisite for such verification to be possible. Meaning as truth conditions needs to be generalized somewhat for the case of imperatives or questions, but is a common ground among all contemporary theories, in one form or another, and has an extensive philosophical justification,

A semantic description of a language is some finitely stated mechanism that allows us to say, for each sentence of the language, what its truth conditions are. Just as for grammatical description, a semantic theory will characterize complex and novel sentences on the basis of their constituents: their meanings, and the manner in which they are put together. The basic constituents will ultimately be the meanings of words and morphemes. The modes of combination of constituents are largely determined by the syntactic structure of the language. In general, to each syntactic rule combining some sequence of child constituents into a parent constituent, there will correspond some semantic operation combining the meanings of the children to produce the meaning of the parent.

3.5.2 Practical Applications of Semantics

Some natural language processing tasks (e.g., message routing, textual information retrieval, translation) can be carried out quite well using statistical or pattern matching techniques that do not involve semantics in the sense assumed above. However, performance on some of these tasks improves if semantic processing is involved. (Not enough progress has been made to see whether this is true for all of the tasks).

Some tasks, however, cannot be carried out at all without semantic processing of some form. One important example application is that of database query, of the type chosen for the Air Travel Information Service (ATIS) task For example, if a user asks, “Does every flight from London to San Francisco stop over in Reykyavik?” then the system needs to be able to deal with some simple semantic facts. Relational databases do not store propositions of the form every X has property P and so a logical inference from the meaning of the sentence is required. In this case, every X has property P is equivalent to there is no X that does not have property P and a system that knows this will also therefore know that the answer to the question is no if a non-stopping flight is found and yes otherwise.

Any kind of generation of natural language output (e.g., summaries of financial data, traces of KBS system operations) usually requires semantic processing. Generation requires the construction of an appropriate meaning representation, and then the production of a sentence or sequence of sentences which express the same content in a way that is natural for a reader to comprehend,. To illustrate, if a database lists a 10 a.m.\ flight from London to Warsaw on the 1st–14th, and 16th–30th of November, then it is more helpful to answer the question What days does that flight go? by Every day except the 15th instead of a list of 30 days of the month. But to do this the system needs to know that the semantic representations of the two propositions are equivalent.

3.5.3 Development of Semantic Theory

It is instructive, though not historically accurate, to see the development of contemporary semantic theories as motivated by the deficiencies that are uncovered when one tries to take the FOPC example further as a model for how to do natural language semantics. For example, the technique of associating set theoretic denotations directly with syntactic units is clear and straightforward for the artificial FOPC example. But when a similar programme is attempted for a natural language like English, whose syntax is vastly more complicated, the statement of the interpretation clauses becomes in practice extremely baroque and unwieldy, especially so when sentences that are semantically but not syntactically ambiguous are considered. For this reason, in most semantic theories, and in all computer implementations, the interpretation of sentences is given indirectly. A syntactically disambiguated sentence is first translated into an expression of some artificial logical language, where this expression in its turn is given an interpretation by rules analogous to the interpretation rules of FOPC. This process factors out the two sources of complexity whose product makes direct interpretation cumbersome: reducing syntactic variation to a set of common semantic constructs; and building the appropriate set-theoretical objects to serve as interpretations.

The first large scale semantic description of this type was developed by Montague made a further departure from the model provided by FOPC in using a more powerful logic (intensional logic) as an intermediate representation language. All later approaches to semantics follow Montague in using more powerful logical languages: while FOPC captures an important range of inferences (involving, among others, words like every, and some as in the example above), the range of valid inference patterns in natural languages is far wider. Some of the constructs that motivate the use of richer logics are sentences involving concepts like necessity or possibility and propositional attitude verbs like believe or know, as well as the inference patterns associated with other English quantifying expressions like most or more than half, which cannot be fully captured within FOPC

For Montague, and others working in frameworks descended from that tradition (among others, Partee, e.g., Krifka, and Groenendijk and Stokhof, the intermediate logical language was merely a matter of convenience which could in principle always be dispensed with provided the principle of compositionality was observed. (I.e., The meaning of a sentence is a function of the meanings of its constituents, attributed to Frege, For other approaches, (e.g., Discourse Representation Theory, an intermediate level of representation is a necessary component of the theory, justified on psychological grounds, or in terms of the necessity for explicit reference to representations in order to capture the meanings of, for example, pronouns or other referentially dependent items, elliptical sentences or sentences ascribing mental states (beliefs, hopes, intentions). In the case of computational implementations, of course, the issue of the dispensability of representations does not arise: for practical purposes, some kind of meaning representation is a sine qua non for any kind of computing.

3.5.4 Discourse Representation Theory

Discourse Representation Theory (DRT) as the name implies, has taken the notion of an intermediate representation as an indispensable theoretical construct, and, as also implied, sees the main unit of description as being a discourse rather than sentences in isolation. One of the things that makes a sequence of sentences constitute a discourse is their connectivity with each other, as expressed through the use of pronouns and ellipsis or similar devices. This connectivity is mediated through the intermediate representation, however, and cannot be expressed without it.

3.5.5 Dynamic Semantics

Dynamic semantics (e.g., takes the view that the standard truth-conditional view of sentence meaning deriving from the paradigm of FOPC does not do sufficient justice to the fact that uttering a sentence changes the context it was uttered in. Deriving inspiration in part from work on the semantics of programming languages, dynamic semantic theories have developed several variations on the idea that the meaning of a sentence is to be equated with the changes it makes to a context.

Update semantics approaches have been developed to model the effect of asserting a sequence of sentences in a particular context. In general, the order of such a sequence has its own significance. A sequence like:

Someone’s at the door. Perhaps it’s John. It’s Mary!

is coherent, but not all permutations of it would be:

Someone’s at the door. It’s Mary. Perhaps it’s John.

Recent strands of this work make connections with the artificial intelligence literature on truth maintenance and belief revision

Dynamic predicate logic extends the interpretation clauses for FOPC (or richer logics) by allowing assignments of denotations to subexpressions to carry over from one sentence to its successors in a sequence. This means that dependencies that are difficult to capture in FOPC or other non-dynamic logics, such as that between someone and it in:

Someone’s at the door. It’s Mary.

can be correctly modeled, without sacrificing any of the other advantages that traditional logics offer.

3.5.6 Situation Semantics and Property Theory

One of the assumptions of most semantic theories descended from Montague is that information is total, in the sense that in every situation, a proposition is either true or it is not. This enables propositions to be identified with the set of situations (or possible worlds) in which they are true. This has many technical conveniences, but is descriptively incorrect, for it means that any proposition conjoined with a tautology (a logical truth) will remain the same proposition according to the technical definition. But this is clearly wrong: all cats are cats is a tautology, but The computer crashed, and The computer crashed and all cats are cats are clearly different propositions (reporting the first is not the same as reporting the second, for example).

Situation theory has attempted to rework the whole logical foundation underlying the more traditional semantic theories in order to arrive at a satisfactory formulation of the notion of a partial state of the world or situation, and in turn, a more satisfactory notion of proposition. This reformulation has also attempted to generalize the logical underpinnings away from previously accepted restrictions (for example, restrictions prohibiting sets containing themselves, and other apparently paradoxical notions) in order to be able to explore the ability of language to refer to itself in ways that have previously resisted a coherent formal description

الفرج من عندك يارب

سود الله وجهك ياوزير التعليم واعلى كعبك بالنار على مافعلته بالمعلمين

لقد جعلتنا اضحوكة للجميع
والادهى من ذلك كما دأبت الحكومة المصرية على عدم الاستماع لمواطنيها وسدت واصمت اذانها بالزفت والقار

عن الاستماع لكل مايمس المدرسين

طبعا ماهو انتم امرتوا الوزير وشلته بان يضحكوا علينا
مايقومون به سبه بجبين النظام والحزب الحاكم

لاحل ولن تبرد نار المدرسين الا بقرار باقالة وزير التعليم وتقديمه لمحاكمة عسكريه

نحن المعلمين نطلب تقديمه لمحاكمة عسكريه هو وحسام الببلاوى وجميع العاملين معه

نعم نحن الشعب نطلب ذلك فورا

وكالعادة احنا نؤذن بمالطة

انتم شاطرين بضربنا وسحلنا وسجننا

والان لاتسمعون ولاترون اى شىء

ايها الظلمه
ان شاء الله تحشر ياوزير التعليم مع قارون وهامان وابى ابن خلف

مافيش حاجه بتنفع

ابقى خد معاك مجلس الوزراء بالقبر خلية ينفعك باخرتك

فى عهدك رقصت الرقصات بالمدارس

كل مايروح واحد يجى واحد اشد من الظلمه

اللهم اهلك الظالمين بالظالمين واخرجنا من بينهم سالمين

يارب احنا داخلين على شهر طاهر

ارنا فى هذا الوزير ومن يأتمر بامرة

ارنا فيهم عجائب قدرتك
واشغلهم بالليل والنهار

اللهم ان هناك من المعلمين من انت بحالة عليم اللهم ارفق بنا وبهم واحلل عقدة هذا الوزير من على قفانا هو وجميع مستشاريه

وياكل الدنيا اسمعوا وعوا

هذا مستشار الاعلامى وصف المعلمين بانهم بقر
يارب انت المنتقم

وكالعادة سيادتك ياريس لاتسمع لنا ولاترانا

انته مش فاضى لنا

يعنى هو الوزير ده جاب الحاجات دى من عنده

ولا كل واحد بيعمل اللى هو عاوزة

بكرة هتسأل ياريس
مش انته

كبيرنا

ياريس حسسنا مرة ان احنا ملأ العين والبصر

الفرج من عندك يارب

أكيد ياريس ان هذا الوزير هو وشلته مصورين لك اننا نعطى

دروس خصوصية ياريس هذا الكلام غير صحيح يمكن واحد بالميه او اقل وبعدين اى واحد بيدى دروس مسنود من مدير فاسد او بتوع ضرايب نايمين عنه

دولة الظلم ساعه ودولة الحق الى قيام الساعه

فخامتك احنا مش رجال اعمال غالبيتنا بينتظر المرتب
حرام عليك اوى كده بيننا وبينك حواجب وظلمه وناس مفتريه

اعمل مؤتمر وناقشنا بدون ان يختار رجالك من يتكلم او من يحضر

انته خايف من شعبك ياريس والله عجيبه

احنا عارفين هتقول كفايه ان انا سايبكم تتكلموا مش كده
اعمل مؤتمر عندنا بالمنوفيه وتعالى وانا اوريك العجب

تناقش معانا يزيد حبك بدل مانته مدينا بالصرمة القديمه من يوم ان توليت علينا

تناقش بدون ادنى تدخل ممن يمنعوك من الشعب

ولا ده طبعا طلب مثل عجائب الدنيا السبع

اوقف هذه المهزله فورا
العيال بالشارع بيقول هتمتحنوا تانى